CommercialFleet

Amazon Logistics outsources fleet role to regional couriers

Changes in consumer shopping habits have resulted in a record number of vans on Britain’s roads, but Amazon prefers to work with a raft of vehicle delivery firms rather than operate its own fleet.

The United States-headquartered retailer has set up Amazon Logistics in the UK and unveiled a string of initiatives designed to ensure goods ordered online by consumers are delivered as quickly as possible via its own delivery service.

However, while that service embraces 13 delivery hubs and two sorting centres in Hemel Hempstead and Manchester, the packages are delivered by 45 local and regional courier specialists.

The rise of Amazon in the UK and the continuing growing trend towards more internet shopping and home deliveries means the number of light goods vehicles on the UK’s roads has increased every year since 1996 when there was 2.174 million licensed, according to the Department of Transport.

By the end of the century there were 2.34 million vans and the volume has continued to accelerate breaking through the three million mark in 2006, reaching 3.2 million in 2010 and by mid-2014 the figure had reached 3.46 million.

As online shopping further expands and retailers continue to refine their home delivery service then demand for vans to deliver goods will increase.

A spokeswoman for Amazon UK said: “Amazon Logistics is a technology and logistics platform that empowers local and regional delivery companies across the UK to deliver Amazon packages to customers seven days a week. This platform complements our current large, national delivery partners and provides additional capacity as more and more customers enjoy Amazon Prime’s next day delivery benefits.”

Last month Amazon extended its long-standing partnership with Royal Mail with an expansion of its PickUp Location Programme to include more than 10,500 Post Office branches, taking the total number of customer parcel pickup points across the UK to more than 16,000.

Existing Amazon PickUp Locations include ‘Pass My Parcel’ stores, Collect+ stores and Amazon Lockers. ‘Pass My Parcel’ is the result of a collaboration with newspaper and magazine distributor Smiths News, a division of Connect Group.

Launched in October, the same-day collection service is available at more than 500 newsagents and convenience stores.

Amazon recently added Birmingham International Airport and a number of London tube stations to its ever-expanding list of locker pick-up locations and Christopher North, managing director of Amazon.co.uk, said: “Our intention is to keep rapidly adding to the many thousands of existing pick-up locations to ensure that customers all over the UK are provided with as much choice as possible when it comes to the delivery of their Amazon order.”

 

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Comments

  • Nick Simpson - 12/12/2014 13:04

    Are they really "courier firms" or everybody & anybody that has a car like some of the other carriers ?

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    • Brian goddard - 28/12/2014 02:50

      Well as long as there properly insured , with goods in transit insurence , and buisness insurance , should not be a problem@Nick Simpson -

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    • Ash - 24/09/2015 05:35

      Only my hermes allow car users, not Amazon just to confirm thanks

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  • Brian goddard - 28/12/2014 02:47

    Well let's see if this will work , because I know some couriers are underpaid on there rates , ie as little as 45p a parcel , considering the overheads white van man has , git , insurence etc , mind you lot of ex city link van men available now !!

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  • Anna georgina - 12/01/2015 06:47

    They only succeed in this by paying an appalling low rate to drivers who work up to 14 hours a day

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  • Jen - 05/11/2015 18:07

    It is 6 pm. My parcel from Amazon was 'out for delivery' at 7.40 am and it still has not arrived. I shall not buy from Amazon again.

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  • DTO - 27/03/2016 16:06

    Having worked both as a courier / driver and as a manger driver I have a good insight into this service. As a driver the wages are not bad if you can follow a satnav on average an 8 to 10 hr day some finish sooner and some finish later but most do a 8.30 hr working day. The driver managers are underpaid and over worked with 14 to 16 hrs as a standard day. As a model it works but if I was Amazon I would control the length of time the driver managers were on site this would lead to better customer services Amazon feel free to contact me on this post if you wish.

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  • Tiggs. - 14/04/2016 18:42

    My husband works for one of the courier companies that deliver for Amazon. I can tell it's slave labour. He arrives at the collection yard early in the morning, and ahs to wait nearly 3 hours every morning before delivery trunks come in. By the time he gets to his first call it's lunch time. He signed a contract for 100-120 drops a day, but Amazon are giving routes much more, recently he has been going out with at least 150 drops and is expected to deliver them ALL or he won't get paid. I'm lucky if I see him before 9.00pm, and it's getting worse. Anyone thinking of doing this job DON'T. Amazon are not interested that you've left the house over 12 hours earlier, it's get the job done or don't get paid. They overwork their staff in the warehouses, and through their delivery companies. It's only £100 a day btw, definitely NOT worth it!!

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